Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Passion meter.

As I go about my life, I meet many people. Some are famous. Others are young. Many are experienced. A few are truly awesome. I seem to appreciate the individualities of these persons in many different ways. One of the most important, however, is what I would call a "passion meter".

The question is how passionate a person is about his or her life. Passion can be nurtured in adversities, so the superficial success or failure are not that important. Intelligence also does relatively little to do with the passion level.

When professing a cause, the key concern is how deeply the antagonist actually believes in that cause. In many cases, people are just saying niceties, and do not actually put their energy into the realization of the causes. Some people are too established to really care for other people or themselves.

The greatest tragedy in life is the loss of passion. When a nation or a society suffers from it, inevitable decline follows. In many cases, people do not notice the decline, as their eyes are blind to the fact that they can convert difficulties into passion, if and only if they have the courage to do so.

So I go about the world today again with my passion meter. When I encounter an outlier of magnitude in the passion measure, I consider it as one of the rare blessings to my life.


8 comments:

Calvin said...

Do you know Ayn Rand, Dr. Mogi?

Ted said...

I teach junior high students English in Japan and I'm worried about their loss of passion. They seem to think it's childish and uncool to be passionate. I hope it's just a rite of passage for them and they will soon realize what a life is all about.

yuzu said...

Dear:Mr.Mogi
You are always Sunshine.

Greg said...

Passion combined with compassion and purpose are the ingredients of a remarkable person. We've all encountered people who had some of these qualities. It's the ones with all three is some unique combination who draw our attention and sometimes our envy and admiration. Is it coincidence that there are several TV programs set in the bakumatsu (end-of-shogunate) and early Meiji eras? The people of that time show a zest for learning and change that we may be missing today.

Passionfruit said...

It is true that we can convert difficulties into passion. As passion includes sufferings, all we have to do is to get a clue.
My passion meter is continuity. Looking back at myself, only troublesome matters are long lasting.

Heat wave...
I'd like to have cool watermelon.

Petrusa de Koker said...

Indeed it is a blessing to encounter a person who is passionate about his/her life and the things to do! ...and there are so few of them. However, I am glad there are at least a few of them. :-)

(ma)gog said...

I am really looking forward to seeing how high the mesurement of my passion meter goes up when I finally come to see you in a week!

I will be so disappointed if I couldn't get the opportunity to ask you for your autograph with an illustration!!

Well, I am going to start finally preparing for the long awaited trip to my home country Japan.

I am leaving the day after tomorrow!!!

砂山鉄夫(Tetsu Sunayama) said...

This essay reminds me of something I had forgotten for a long time...